Cornell University Press Welcomes Emily Andrew

UnknownCornell University Press is pleased to announce the appointment of Emily Andrew as senior acquisitions editor. Emily Andrew comes to Cornell University Press with two decades of experience in scholarly publishing, most recently at the University of British Columbia Press and, prior to that, at the University of Toronto Press. She also has worked in commercial publishing, as well as at a nonfiction literary agency.

Emily begins work at Cornell University Press at the beginning of July. She will be acquiring projects in areas that include military history, modern European history, Asian history, and law and society.

Throughout her publishing career Emily has acquired in a wide range of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, spanning the most abstract of literary studies to quantitative political science. Notable achievements include the establishment of a highly regarded series in military history that incorporates home front and battlefront, social history and operational history; acquiring and editing a collection of books probing the “democratic deficit” of public institutions and political participation;  and spearheading a cross-disciplinary series in disability studies.

“We are honored to have Emily Andrew join our editorial team,” said editor-in-chief Mahinder Kingra. “She brings with her a wealth of experience in publishing and tremendous insight into a wide range of scholarship. Throughout her career, she has shown herself to be remarkably fluent in academic discourse while also understanding the imperatives of publishing and how to use the highest standards of scholarly communication to reach a broad audience both within and beyond the academy.”

A graduate of the University of British Columbia, Emily also earned a degree in African American history from the University of Toronto.

In her spare time, she enjoys attending music festivals, watching her son play house league hockey, and eating well. She is currently reading Greg Grandin’s Bancroft Prize–winning book The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World.

Please join us in welcoming Emily!

Cornell University Press Welcomes Emily Andrew

Bill Gates names Eradication one of “The Best Books I Read in 2015”

Eradication: Ridding the World of Diseases Forever? by Nancy Leys Stepan is one the six best books Bill Gates read in 2015. You can watch his video review of the book here. Gates writes on his blog:

“Stepan’s history of eradication efforts gives you a good sense of how involved the work can get, how many different kinds of approaches have been tried without success, and how much we’ve learned from our failures. She writes in a fairly academic style that may make it hard for non-experts to get to her valuable arguments, but it’s worth the effort. You come away from it with a clearer sense of how we can use the lessons of the past to guide future efforts to save lives.”

Bill Gates names Eradication one of “The Best Books I Read in 2015”

Marina Rustow named 2015 MacArthur Fellow

Congratulations to Marina Rustow, author of Heresy and the Politics of Community: The Jews of the Fatimid Caliphate, who has been named a 2015 MacArthur Fellow on the basis of her work with the Cairo Geniza texts. From the MacArthur Foundation’s description of Rustow’s work:

“In Heresy and the Politics of Community: The Jews of the Fatimid Caliphate (2008), Rustow focuses on the period from 909 to 1171 C.E. and upends long-accepted ideas about the relationship between two rival Jewish communities under Fatimid rule. Prior historians, basing their interpretation on literary polemics, had depicted the Rabbanites and Karaites (or Qaraites) of Egypt and Syria as factions bitterly divided by theological difference, the latter branded as heretics and marginalized. Rustow examined nonliterary Geniza documents (such as letters, legal contracts, and state petitions and decrees) and revealed a wealth of social, economic, and political transactions between the two groups. The finding calls into question the depth of the religious schism, suggesting a higher level of tolerance and cooperation than had been assumed.”

Marina Rustow named 2015 MacArthur Fellow

The American Way of Bombing Reviewed in H-Diplo

Mark J. Conversino reviews The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical and Legal Norms, from Flying Fortresses to Drones, edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue in the August 2015 edition of H-Diplo, H-Net Reviews. Here’s an excerpt:

The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical and Legal Norms, From Flying Fortresses to Drones, edited by Matthew Evangelista and Henry Shue, brings together an array of historians, practitioners, and legal experts from both the military and civilian worlds. Overall, the volume is balanced and the authors engage with logic and consistency. This collection is a vital resource for military professionals, policymakers, and scholars alike. Unfortunately, the challenges of norm-setting in aerial warfare chronicled here are far from over and likely to become even more contentious in light of ongoing military and counterterrorist operations across the globe and in the face of rapid technological change.”—Mark J. Conversino, H-Diplo, H-Net Reviews

The American Way of Bombing Reviewed in H-Diplo