Nitsan Chorev Reflects on the “Report of the Ebola Interim Assessment Panel”

An Assessment Panel assessing the response of the World Health Organization (WHO) to the Ebola crisis concluded, in no uncertain terms, that, “The Ebola crisis . . . exposed organizational failings in the functioning of the WHO,” and called for important organizational reforms.[1] While insightful, the analysis looks at the current situation with little attention to the historical context leading to existing deficiencies. Without understanding the sources of the current problems, it might be hard to fix them.

The WHO’s organizational difficulties today are not inherent or necessary aspects of this or any other international organization. Indeed, during most of its existence, the WHO was one of the more respected UN agencies. Instead, the WHO was thwarted by policy changes implemented over the past twenty years, which have undermined its operational capabilities and neglected poor countries’ health care infrastructure. The consequences of those changes today—lack of international alertness and a dire situation of health clinics in many countries—is why Ebola has turned into an international emergency, which could and should have been prevented.  Continue reading “Nitsan Chorev Reflects on the “Report of the Ebola Interim Assessment Panel””

Nitsan Chorev Reflects on the “Report of the Ebola Interim Assessment Panel”

Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory in American Scientist

Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory, edited by Emily Monosson, is reviewed by Londa Schiebinger in American Scientist. Here’s an excerpt:

Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory makes evident the institutional structures that block parents’ careers, but, more important, it reveals the myriad ways in which male partners of mothers don’t shoulder their fair share of the physical and psychological labor associated with child care. What’s going on with these men? Some of them probably think that because they are more established in their careers or make more money than their partners, they are justified in leaving domestic drudgery to the women who were once their intellectual companions.

Read the whole thing here: Changing Assumptions

Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory in American Scientist