Recent Award Winners

Russian Hajj: Empire and the Pilgrimage to Mecca by Eileen Kane: Winner, Marshall Shulman Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable mention, Reginald Zelnik Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable mention, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

Making Uzbekistan: Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Early USSR by Adeeb Khalid: Winner, Reginald Zelnik Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

The Merchants of Siberia: Trade in Early Modern Eurasia by Erika Monahan: Honorable Mention, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery by Margaret Ellen Newell: Winner, Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize (Massachusetts Historical Society)

The Depths of Russia: Oil, Power, and Culture after Socialism by Douglas Rogers: Winner, Davis Center Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Winner, Ed A. Hewett Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable Mention, Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

The Devil’s Chain: Prostitution and Social Control in Partitioned Poland by Keely Stauter-Halsted: Winner, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

 

Recent Award Winners

Press author Sara Danius in the news

Sara Danius, author of The Senses of Modernism: Technology, Perception, and Aesthetics, is the Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy, which awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature to Bob Dylan today  “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”

Bob Dylan wins 2016 Nobel Prize in literature—live updates from the Guardian 

Bob Dylan Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature (New York Times)

Press author Sara Danius in the news

Recent Award Winners

Necessary Luxuries: Books, Literature, and the Culture of Consumption in Germany, 1770–1815 by Matt Erlin is the winner of the DAAD Book Prize (German Studies Association)

The Consuming Temple: Jews, Department Stores, and the Consumer Revolution in Germany, 1880-1940 by Paul Lerner is the winner of the Dorothy Rosenberg Prize (American Historical Association)

Chariots of Ladies: Francesc Eiximenis and the Court Culture of Medieval and Early Modern Iberia by Nuria Silleras-Fernandez is the winner of the Premio del Rey (American Historical Association)

The Devil’s Chain: Prostitution and Social Control in Partitioned Poland by Keely Stauter-Halsted is the winner of the Joan Kelly Memorial Prize (American Historical Association)

Making and Unmaking Nations: War, Leadership, and Genocide in Modern Africa by Scott Straus is the winner of the Joseph S. Lepgold Book Prize (Georgetown University)

Recent Award Winners

Marisa Scheinfeld on photographing the Borscht Belt

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The author at work: pool at Lewinters Bungalow Colony, Monticello, New York

Marisa Scheinfeld, the author of The Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America’s Jewish Vacationland, out this fall from Cornell University Press, answers frequently asked questions about the making of her book. 

On the genesis of The Borscht Belt
I always was around photography. My grandmother always had a camera. She still walks around with one, everywhere she goes. I never used to enjoy being in the photographs. But I’ve grown to understand why she was always taking pictures and enthusiastically posing family members to preserve the moment. I was exposed to the arts at an early age and attended a Montessori school as a young child. In high school I spent all my time in the art room. It was also in high school that I took my first photography class: traditional black-and-white photography. All the magic that happens, and the things that get you hooked, got me there. So I guess in some ways, I never looked back.


The Borscht Belt is a cherished part of Americana, written about countless times in literature and personal memoirs. Yet it is slowly being forgotten.


Continue reading “Marisa Scheinfeld on photographing the Borscht Belt”

Marisa Scheinfeld on photographing the Borscht Belt

Prescription for Hillary: Be Like Ike

By Barbara A. Perry, co-editor of 42: Inside the Presidency of Bill Clinton

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Source: Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library

In the fall of 1955 President Dwight Eisenhower, once a four-pack-a-day smoker, had a brush with the Grim Reaper. While vacationing at his mother-in-law’s Denver home, Ike suffered a serious heart attack that landed him in an oxygen tent at Fitzsimons Army Hospital. For seven weeks he was confined to the facility, treated by a team of physicians, in consultation with famed Harvard-trained cardiologist Paul Dudley White, who flew in from Boston. Unlike his former commander-in-chief Franklin Roosevelt, at death’s door during the 1944 reelection campaign, Eisenhower insisted that the public know about his condition. “Tell the truth, the whole truth; don’t try to conceal anything,” the president instructed Press Secretary James Hagerty, who arrived on the scene from Washington the night after his boss was stricken. Following some confusion and misleading reports over the president’s condition in the initial hours of the crisis, Hagerty and Dr. White held informative news conferences to update the nation on the chief executive’s treatment and prognosis.


“Tell the truth, the whole truth; don’t try to conceal anything,” the president instructed Press Secretary James Hagerty, who arrived on the scene from Washington the night after his boss was stricken.


Continue reading “Prescription for Hillary: Be Like Ike”

Prescription for Hillary: Be Like Ike